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20130121
20130129
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that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
to succeed in today's market place. despate progress in education, too many of our schools are still lagging behind, some way behind and especially heart breaking to this father, one in five hoosier children lives in poverty. that is simply unacceptable. [applause] with so many families and business struggling just to get by we have no choice but to remain bold. we have to do better and we will do better and doing better starts with the right priorities. by adopting a road map that says yes to our future and believes in the ununlimited potential of our people and it start by making job creation job one in this assembly and all over this state. [applause] that's why on day one of our administration i signed a moratorium on any regulations to ensure that indiana is not burdening hoosiers employ remembers unnecessary red tape and that's why we proposed a job budget last week. our budget is honestly balanced holds the line on spending, funds our priorities, builds our reserves and it lets hard working hoosiers keep more of what they earned. now let's be clear: government doesn't create jo
? >> the evidence is compelling, education, human capital, people can work with information and technology. and many people in american society today, cannot afford by themselves to get that kind of education. you can make resources available to support younger people and families that is good for them, that is good for the economy, and that is good for the tax base. it is going to strengthen the budget. >> in terms of competitiveness worldwide, building a stronger work force, as you mentioned, early childhood education to college education is vital to american competitiveness, suspect it? >> is the number one determining informant. how much do we produce in this economy? number one, looking forward is human capital, that is about education, the ability to innovate and work with the new technologies. >> over the short run, what is the effect of across the board cuts on pell grants on research funding--for medical research and scientific research? >> it is all going to be negative for growth and human capital. it is also going to give you negative impact on the budget. >> while the most immediate con
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program won't have enough money to pay its bills. now, whose bills? bills of seniors, bills of tennesseans who have been -- who are some, many are literal counting the days until they are old enough to be eligible for medicare so they can have some way to pay their medical bills. it would be a tragedy if that day arrived and there wasn't enough money to pay the bills, but the medicare trustees who by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program f
said, i'm going to do it in health care, education and energy. now think about that, health care is one-sixth, and then you control the production and the price and you control everything and he tried to with cap and trade but failed. and education is the future. you control the three elements there and you've goten what lennon would call the commanding heights of a post industrial society. that's what he said he wanted to do. but you don't remember this because unlike me, you have real lives, you don't have to watch everything the man says, i do for my sins and they clearly are many, but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase, the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered, but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech when they give out the printed version of it was called the new foundation. he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appalachian, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ide
adults. finally, with the department of education, hhs will soon launch what we are calling a national dialogue on mental health to help change the conversation and galvanize action about our children's mental health. we have come a long way in the prevention, treatment, and recovery support for mental and addictive disorders, but we have a long way to go, and we can do better. thank you for your time today, and i would be very pleased to answer any questions you may have. >> thank you very much. now we will turn to dr. insel. welcome, once again. please proceed. >> thank you, mr. chairman, ranking member alexander, and members of the committee. it is a real honor to be here, and it is a real pairing to have hyde -- administrator hyde and me on the same panel. as a person coming to you from the national institute of mental health and the national institutes of health, my role is around the research related to mental illness and thinking about how to come up with the science that will lead to better diagnostics, better therapeutics, a better understanding of what you called a silent epi
liberal education system as well as a very liberal media in general. my expectation with kids coming out of high school or college this sort of seem to think the government just passed the money and gives it out. if they don't seem to realize until much later in life that they're taking my money and giving it out. so i think it's an educational problem, much deeper than whether a candidate is running in a particular town. thanks for c-span. host: peter, thanks for the call. guest: conservatives have a lot of work to do in the media and in education. the media situation is a lot more balanced than 20 years ago or 30 years ago. a couple of major newspapers and magazines have collapsed. young people can access a ton of points of view and a lot of data and information and that is a healthy thing. people complain about the internet and all of these blogs and what happened to the good old days when you had serious editors manning the phones? i think the current situation is much healthier for a vigorous democracy and there's a lot of good stuff out there. if we have a piece on our website, a w
in it, educate themselves better for it i try hard to make the book the festival. i have policy recommendations. >> where did it all start for you. ? where is your birth town? >> kansas. there is a symmetry with my personality. >> when did you know you would be an independent person? >> i think i have always been. i grew up in southeast kansas. independence is a small town. people always had to be a bit scrappy. the roads have improved a little bit since i have moved away. it is somewhat reflective of where i grew up. my parents were depression-era kids. they were very poor. they had a lot of strength. it is probably a personality trait i have had throughout my life. >> where did you go to college? >> cambridge university. a product of public schools all the way through. a public-school education served me well. it saddens me because i think it is basic to what america is about to give everybody a basic shot and have an opportunity. it starts with public education. christ, and the total years have you worked in government? >> a lot. since 1981, really. i was a civil rights attor
how we can better use those resources not only to support public endeavors like education and public safety and roads, but also of money that could be pumped into the private sector. >> david, if you have another question or comment, we are almost at the end of our time. but we can squeeze one -- ok. i think we have not at all exhausted this topic. we may have exhausted our panelists and some of you. we will return to its. this has been -- at least for a poor country lawyer, a very enlightening discussion of the economic issues. we've not done too much with the politics. i suppose there might be a smidgen of that in some of the decisions that get made over the next month's. let me take this occasion to thank you for a plethora of wonderful questions and for hanging in there in a very difficult topic. think our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only provided us -- thank our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only providing us this topic, but great direction in shaping this program. i would like you to think -- join me in thanking our panel for a terrific discussion. [appl
laid out a number of executive actions was secretary arne duncan of the department of education that look at schools and the climate of bullying, school security increasing the number of school resource officers. a number of schools have metal detectors in them. if local schools want to increase their security, there are obviously free to do that. appropriations may be there to increase that. keeping the guns out of the hands of people who would use them for ill is the number one priority as well. i think you also have to take a look at what has happened in schools. a lot of people forget at columbine, they're actually where guards on the campus. they exchanged fire with the perpetrators of the crime. they were outgunned because the military-style assault weapons. it is not just having police and armed folks on school campuses. virginia tech had a police force and is what squad and they still were not able to bring down the shooter. host: the washington times above this --spreading gun hysteria is the way they put it. they ride gun owners should be concerned about the open seaso
, education, and agriculture. security is a very minor part, but an important part, but a very minor part. i think that is probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance that i referred to in my opening comment tells me that in africa, we are to seek a light footprint and innovative approaches and low costs approaches to achieving the united states security objective. we have one base in africa. we have about 2000 people. it supports not only u.s. africa command, but u.s. central command and the transportation command as well. that is our residence on the continent. -- that is our presence on the continent. there are 100 personnel who are supporting africans in the effort to joseph kony and his senior lieutenants to justice. they are indicted by the international criminal court. there is a u.s. log that tells us to do that -- u.s. law that tells us to do that. if there is a law that tells us to do that, we go and do that. and it is important part of the consideration. as i mentioned, i have been to or need to of the different countries. -- i have been to 42 other different countrie
during the darkest periods in our shared history? will the commend the work of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and a developed country and raising his find -- final issue and praising the holocaust education trust. absolutely brilliant organization that make sure young people from schools across our country get the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible events of the holocaust took place. i had privileges we could meeting with a survivor whose story was truly heroic and truly heartbreaking. but who in her 90s is still making these arguments in making this case so that future generations will and. we should also learn not just about the european holocaust but what has happened recently in rwanda, in bosnia, in cambodia and elsewhere that tragically there is far too much prejudice in our world. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, can i join the prime minister in thing to be to kingsman david robert shaw of first battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment. each of the utmost courage and bravery and the condol
of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and indeed the whole country in raising this vital issue, and in pleasing. praising the holocaust educational trust -- an absolutely brilliant charity an organization and makes sure that young people from schools across our country have the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible event of the holocaust took place. i had an immense privilege of meeting with a holocaust survivor whose store was truly rock and truly heartbreaking, but in her 90s, she is still making these arguments and making this case so future generations will learn. we should also learn, not just about the european holocaust, but what has happened recently in rwanda, bosnia, cambodia. >> can i join the prime minister in paying tribute to kinsman david robert schock of first battalion of the duke of lancaster is regiment? he showed the utmost courage and bravery, and the condolences of the whole house to go to his family and friends. can the prime minister guarantee that if he gets his in a eight- out referendum he will cam
. i have worked with republican governors to pass balanced budget while protecting of education and vital health care programs. it's really the same principled debate that's happening here, how to balance the budget but do it in ways that are responsible and that protect the middle class, that protect medicare and social security, but also reached across the aisle and do it in ways that are constructive and that allowance to reach compromise together. host: you mentioned your service in the state legislature in nevada. why come to washington? what can you do differently than you can back home? guest: our legislature in nevada is a citizens legislature. we met every other year. in addition to being a legislator, i work full time. i'm husband and father of three. this gives me an opportunity to serve my constituents 100% of the time. extremely humbling and honoring experience to be here. host: the debt ceiling vote, scheduled to see that happen today. how do you plan to vote? and once your opinion? guest: we really need a longer- term policy that allows greater certainty particula
or her choices. when it comes to education, something i care deeply about, let the democrats extol the virtues of are hopelessly antiquated one-size-fits-all factor schools where the child follows the dollars. meanwhile, let us republicans the to the success of child- centered education solutions that meet the needs of the digital age. [applause] these are but a few examples of the way we must fight the battle of ideas. it must be how we win the argument. one thing we've got to get straight right now -- washington has spent a generation trying to bribe our citizens and export of our states. as republicans, it is time to quit arguing around the edges of this current system. that brings me to my third point -- i want to shift gears and speak to changes i think we must make if we need to win elections. i'm not one of those who believes we need to abandon or change our principles. this observation badly disappoints many of our friends like liberals in the national media. real change means supporting abortion on demand for the national media. for them, real change means abandoning tradi
of us. they work across the aisle when possible and expand opportunity through education reform. i cannot wait to see what they can accomplish this year. when you take stock of all of this, it might seem you right now, but it will grow. as the president implement his agenda, it won't be pretty. at that moment, we will be ready. we will offer an alternative vision. we will explain how our vision differs and how it rests on vibrant communities and increases upward mobility. we will show how we can govern better by governing closer to the people and strengthening families and their livelihoods. we will make it clear that we have better ideas to combat poverty. our policies will lift everyone in this country. we will translate that vision into a governing agenda. that is how you offer enduring solutions. we will say to the country, here is our plan for the country, for the budget, for healthcare, for energy, defense. when we do that, we put our plans out against the president's results, i think we will compare quite favorably. we will win back the trust of the american people and put o
it is dollars. meanwhile let us republicans feature the successed of child sentered education solutions, education solutions where the dollars follow the child. [applause] these are but a few examples of the way we must fight the battle or how we must win the argument. one thing we've got to get straight right now washington has spent a generation trying to bribe our citizens and extort our states. as republicans it's time to quit arguing around the edges of this corrupt system. that brings me to my third point which i want to shift gears and speak to changes i believe we must make if we are to win elections. as i ipped kated before i do not believe we need to abandon or change our principles. i know this observation disappoints many of our friends in the national media of course. for those in the national media that means supporting abortion on demand without policy. that means abandoning traditional marriage. for them real change means agreing to higher taxes every year to pay for government expanse and real change means engorsing the lightened policies of european social lism. that i
five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause]
will do it in health care, education and energy. think about that. health care is one sixth of the economy. energy, you control the production and the pricing and control everything from he tried to with capt. trade and he tried. education is the future. you control those three elements and you have what lenin would call the commanding height of a post industrial society. that is what he said he wanted to do. in fact, you don't remember this because, unlike me, you have real lives for it you don't have to watch everything the man says. i do for my sins and they clearly are mending. [laughter] but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase -- the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered. but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech was called "the new foundation." he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appellation, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ideologically ambitious he was from day
of this over a period of years. and her goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. it's very much in its time that we can teach people certain skills. >> the dark side of the personal finances industry saturday night at 10:00 on afterwards on c-span2. and look for more book tv online. like us on facebook. >> but i think it's all an evolutionary process. you grow into this role. and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you are always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues that you care about. you're never done. so there is never a point in time where you feel like i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. it's changes given the state of the country and you don't know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and open to involve. >> the first ladies their public and private lives. >> c-span is teaming up for a series for television, first ladies influence and image airing over two seasons. season one begins president's day at 9:00 eastern
is undecided about her pregnancy, she's educated about all the options available to her. the knowledge that a pregnancy center can provide her, with the help she needs during pregnancy and after she needs the baby -- she has the baby, often makes the difference between life and death of the child in her womb. regardless of the mistakes she may have made in her life or the decisions she makes for her future, she is treated with love and respect. i commend and i thank god for the thousands of staff and volunteers at pregnancy resource centers all over this nation. we are a very bright light in the midst of a dark state of affairs. with god's help, we will prevail. [applause] i would like to leave you with a verse from the old testament. it is from genesis chapter 50. it has sustained me and it has given me hope. you intended to harm me, but god intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives in many ways. god bless you all, and thank you. [applause] [chanting u.s.a.] >> nellie, we made it. thank you for your prayers up there. thank you all for being he
litigate around the country and to public education on lgbt and hiv-r elated rights issues. host: republican line. gloria, good morning. caller: good morning, gentlemen. thank you for taking my call to my family is six generations and the great state of california, and we have seen many changes take place, especially with regard to the issues that are on your program today. i am sure you probably know that in the 1950's, the greektown of san diego -- not san diego, san francisco, passed the ordinance to protect homosexuals from being attacked. you would go to jail if you beat someone out or when after someone and cause them harm because of their sexual preference. but we've also seen in the great state of california this issue turned into a mainly a white, very well established, male- dominated issue. the men who are gay in this state are not pork, they are not an agitated, and they -- not poor, not uneducated, and they are long on opportunity. i think the issue of not allowing people to have a say on what their preference is is a difficult and unpleasant hill to swallow. we've
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
as result and thchildren's education suffers also? does he not think it's time to regulate private sector rent to bring in a fair rate policy in this country so that families are not forced out of the communities where they and their families could live for a very long time? >> what i would say to the honorable gentleman is he does have to recognize we inherited a situation in terms of housing benefit in london that was completely out of control. some families were getting as much as 104,000 pounds for one family for one year. even today we are still spending something like 6 billion pounds on housing benefit in london. i think we have to recognize that higher levels of housing benefit and higher rents were chasing each other up in a spiral. i don't suort the idea of rent-controlled because i think what we'll see is a massive decline in the private rented sector which is what happened last time we had such rent-controlled that's what we need is prop regulation of housing benefit and making sure we have a competitive system for private sector renting, and also making sure w build more flat
states, you have to do education and you got to do treatment, because what we have is just a revolving circle of demand and we are not alone. europe is a huge demand, russia now increasing demand. cocaine routes and marijuana routes are not just coming up from colombia and other countries and latin america and the caribbean up to here, but going across the atlantic and going to other countries and comes from asia. it is pandemic. so i think we need a more comprehensive approach, one where it is less finger pointing and you work cooperatively to understand everybody's role in trying to do something about it. i have always felt that this label of war on drugs, is kind of artificial, because war implies is it's all out and you have to win. and i don't think it's all been out. and principally because we have failed to do our part in education, and abstinence. we have to engage ourselves and that would help establish credibility and viability with other countries. >> thank you very much for those answers. >> senator paul. >> senator kerry, thanks for coming today and your testimony. i agree
issues to disparity in education and health care, would also be put on the agenda, and those would also be addressed. certainly a lot of that has not happened, and there is certainly a disappointment across large sectors of the black community. but it is also realistic also a sense of the constraint that the president has had. and it is not just about the president. it is also bought congress, about state houses, and about governors. there is a broader political strategy that has to enfold to achieve some of the things that people hoped would happen when president obama was elected. host: barbara, anything to add to that? guest: it is often hard to maintain the kind of levels of excitement from the first inaugural to the second, and that applies to any president, particularly this one because the expectations were so high. i compared it to a second marriage. hard to rekindle that sparked sometimes. perhaps it is the more like renewing the vows. the american people ought to fall in love again with the president. they want to have that hope and expectation. there are lots of people here.
, whether it's global health or whether it is education, we are doing things that are making a difference in people's lives with respect to those rights. i am absolutely committed -- usaid gets criticized and there have been some obvious problems with our contractor-aide relationships in the past. the committee i i think did superb work in putting a -- out a report with respect to that, but i think we can do more than we are doing today. >> i appreciate that. we had -- you just had the discussion with senator risch on russia, we have seen some slippage since the breakup of the cold war ending, you mentioned secretary kissinger's comments in 1994, the complexity of this arrangement. we have seen slippage. we have seen slippage in russia with their human rights tensions. there's been slippage among our allies in france, what's happened in hungary with recent elections in the government changing, trying to change the constitutional protections. slippage in the ukraine with imprisoning their opposition. our roolingsshep -- relationship where other countries can be ma thure enough where we can
of the department of education. i think that's a great idea for . number of reasons area the fact is, you could do a lot of what people on the right and left on to do in terms of their hat -- pet cuts, and it would do nothing to the long-term trajectory we are on. >> we did a bus tour this year with family research council. we teamed up on this money and his book to a lot of churches. the people willing to listen to it. even among conservative audiences, it is tough to get people to say, those are the programs that we truly have to take on. it is an uphill battle. i think it is one we will be forced into by the very nature of where we are. >> p.j. o'rourke in one of his books has a passage where he says, the democrats are the party of santa claus. santa claus is a wonderful, jolly guy in a red suit who loves everyone and gives everybody presents. he gives you exactly what you want. all you have to do is ask. the republicans are the party of god. god is kind of a stern fellow. he demands good behavior. he has been known to punish people for not doing what they are supposed to do. it is hard to get
, i was a single mom with a ninth grade education when i started. i started with a ged. over the last 20 years, because i made a great decision to drop out of school, i spent 20 years trying to catch up and go back to school. now i have two master degrees. it was the hard way. >> why did you run away from home? >> i thought i knew everything. i was failing school because i had been skipping school. i thought i was in love. i wanted to get married. and i got pregnant. >> when did you live at that time when you got married? >> a small apartment outside washington d.c. >> what happened with your relationship with your parents? >> my mom. she is the sole reason i am where i am today. she was devastated. she was a wonderful mother. she did everything she could write. >> is she alive? >> yes. she lives with me now and i take care of her. she was wonderful. she stood by me when i got divorced and i moved back home. my mother had very little money. we were poor growing up. she took me and my son back in. what little she had, she shared with us. she helped me raise my son. she helped me get my
the age of 21. and it is growing. if they did not find jobs, if they deny get educated, if we do not do something, all of us at the end of the developed world, including china, russia, south korea, brazil, mexico, those developed countries that have the capacity will have to come together and about this. everybody is affected. i think that is a challenge for all of us. that is my response to a very big question that is a legitimate questions. we ought to sit down and work on this over the days ahead. >> thank you, mr. chairman. senator kerry tom hines thrilled to be here -- senator kerry, i am in built to be here. i cannot think of anyone better to continue the efforts of the current administration. thank you for being willing to take on this task. that may well in your family -- let me welcome your family. let me just say i look forward to casting level -- casting my vote in support of u.s. secretary of state and the also join the in defending the red sox and the patriots. >> finally. thank you. >> i want to echo the concern about continuing to support an agenda that urges equal rights
for their continued expansion as a member of the committee on education and the work force. mr. speaker, school choice is an idea that transcends ideology and party affiliation, providing opportunities that every child deserves. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman given one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, there is good news about energy. we have untapped natural resources here at home. in the united states we have natural gas that can be turned into liquefies natural gas. other nations don't have this. we have so much natural gas that we can export it by selling it as l.n.g. not only will it bring money and energy back home, it will create jobs. this means jobs and capital for americans and american companies. even the department of energy says that expanded export of l.n.g. will benefit the united states' economy. in 201
individuals, we learn so much from those. and frankly, for some of us, it was an education that was required because none of us had that experience in our own families, neighborhoods, churches and the rest. maybe it was there, probable it was, but we just didn't know it. but who would do that, hit somebody, but they did. and this bill has to pass. so thank you all very much. >> can i say one more thing, because i want to thank you for this. as far as i'm concerned we have the health care bill because of leader pelosi and up until the time that bill was passed, eight states and the district of columbia considered demresk violence to be a pre-existing condition, did you know that? and if you had been beaten up before, you could not get insurance because you could get beaten up ago. this was in the last couple of years. thank you again for that. >> we have time for a few questions -- this started later than anticipated because of the floor. >> i have a question on an unrelated topic. >> on this subject, because we have before you, as was mentioned, donna edwards has a long history with many of
's presidency. i was listening to one of the speakers. they seem educated. it is imperative that obama touches on more than one issue, rather it is gun control, abortion, etc. in regard to gun control, i live in arizona now. there is not an issue with getting a gun. i do not understand why we are making an attempt to take guns post the newtown issue. if it is a thing of mental health, why are we not addressing that? ronald reagan closed all of the mental health institutions. why aren't we looking into reestablishing them? versus taking one of our basic civil liberties away. guest: absolutely a central aspect to this -- both parties agree in the case of these high- profile shootings that sometimes the problem is with the state of the shooter. we saw that in colorado. in and he, you look back on these instances and it turns out there were warning lines and that the mental health system, the educational system did not have any way of taking these people in and channeling them in some kind of help for themselves. how do you deal with that? how do you fund these programs? all of those are complicat
tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. neal: our job here is to educate the public, not to entertain them. they ran up deficits on the republican side of $6 trillion during an eight-year period of time. $2.3 trillion worth of tax cuts and two wars, and now they come back today with a glitzy proposal, no work, no pay. institutional memory. you remember term limits. remember those in favor say aye line-item veto, the constitutional theorists, they got rid of that. and how about they were going to pass a balanced budget amendment to the constitution? my dad used to say, at least jesse james had enough personal respect to wear a mask. the people that put us into this situation are now quibbling about raising the debt ceiling when they almost broke the country with the proposals that they offered all of those years and never once did they ask president bush. not once did they deny president bush on those proposals. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. mr. camp: i yield one minute to a distinguished member of the ways and means committee,
: our job here is to educate the public, not to entertain them. they ran up deficits on the republican side of $6 trillion during an eight-year period of time. $2.3 trillion worth of tax cuts and two wars, and now they come back today with a glitzy proposal, no work, no pay. institutional memory. you remember term limi. remember those in favor say aye line-item veto, the constitutional theorists, they got rid of that. and how about they were going to pass a balanced budget amendment to the constitution? my dad used to say, at least jesse james had enough personal respect to wear a mask. the ople that put into this situation are now quibbling about raising the debt ceiling when they almost broke the country with the proposals that they offered all those years and never once did they ask president bush. not once did they deny president bush on those proposals. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. mr. camp: i yield one minute to a distinguished member of the ways and means committee, the gentleman from illinois, mr. ross come. the speake
, education, and for the war to end. host: all right. ok. that was douglas in nashville, tennessee, a democrat there. let's hear the president in his own words talking about the economy and his thoughs on social security and medicare. [video clip brbts >> for we, the people understand our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person can find independent and pride in their work. when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty though knows she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else because she is an american, she is free, and she is equal, not just in the eyes of god but also in our own. we, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard shoices -- choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. but we rej
elephant in the room. they say foreign aid, nasa, get rid of the department of education. i think that's a great idea for a number of reasons. the fact is, you could do a lot of what people on the right and left on to do in terms of their pet cuts, and it would do nothing to the long-term trajectory we are on. >> we did a bus tour this year with family research council. we teamed up on this money and values tour his book to a lot of churches. the people willing to listen to it. even among conservative audiences, it is tough to get people to say, those are the programs that we truly have to take on. it is an uphill battle. i think it is one we will be forced into by the very nature of where we are. >> p.j. o'rourke in one of his books has a passage where he says, the democrats are the party of santa claus. santa claus is a wonderful, jolly guy in a red suit who loves everyone and gives everybody presents. he gives you exactly what you want. all you have to do is ask. the republicans are the party of god. god is kind of a stern fellow. he demands good behavior. he has been known to puni
this critical issue is the establishment of the recruiting, education and training oversight council. this council will include the senior leadership of my command and will one, review the progress and effectiveness of the actions we are now implementing. two, provide an expanded perspective on future actions we will take to prevent problems from recurring. and three, advise me on strategic issues affecting airman safety in basic military training. in short, this council will help us institution lies the intense level of focus we must sustain if we are to successfully defeat the threat of sexual misconduct in the basic military training environment. i look forward to your questions after general welsh's remarks. thank you. >> i completely agree that the b.m.t. investigations don't mark the end of anything. the air force has recommitted itself that every airman is treated with respect. it's a way of life. this has been stunning to most of us in the air force. there is simply no excuse for us or no justifiable explanation and there is no way we can allow this to happen again. the goal
the ability to command, control, educate, and oversee, we have the ability to punish. we all the tools in place to be the role models for this. we owe the american people for that. >> general, please, time has expired. please finish that answer for the record. >> mr. nugent. >> thank you, mr. chairman. my big concern, having been a sheriff and prosecuted and investigated sexual assault cases is the victimization. how do we deal with those victims and in particular, as an organization how does the reporting process go? sexual assault or sexual harassment don't always go hand-in-hand. they are different in certain aspects, but the reporting process. the commander makes the decision on whether it goes to a judicial process or if it doesn't? how do they make that decision? >> very often it will be raised by a report to the equal opportunity office on base. the office conducts an investigation and there is a process that it goes through and then there is a decision made on what to do. is there something that you escalate that you deal with this? you make the decision after the promise is co
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